with Rudimental If the singing voice is merely a vehicle for a melody, a means of putting across a verse, a bridge, a chorus, well, somebody forgot to tell Ellie Goulding. As her debut album, Lights, made so thrillingly clear, Ellie uses her voice as a texture in much the same way that a skilled instrumentalist would. Cascading, dovetailing, soaring, swooping, Ellie's layered vocal parts bring a haunting complexity to songs that often come from relatively uncomplicated origins: observations, memories and emotions that trigger a melody, a lyric, bare bones around which Ellie will then build musical and verbal narratives that are at once ornate and austere, passionate and enigmatic. Not even the most ardent fan or keenest student of Lights is going to be prepared for the shock of Ellie's new album Halcyon, however. A musical, vocal and lyrical tempest, the new record describes a journey out of heartache and towards hope, from desolation to renewed faith in the future, set to music that is alternately strident and stunned, emphatic and tentative. Halcyon's lead single, "Anything Could Happen," is classic Ellie: as well as being a song of irresistible propulsion and ferocious, hook-filled power, it is a track whose euphoric optimism is stalked by doubt and ambiguity.