Enrique Bunbury Enrique Bunbury started his singing and songwriting career in 1986, as a member of the legendary Spanish rock band Heroes del Silencio. The group was together for ten years, during which they recorded four studio albums that redefined Spanish rock. Héroes created their own signature style by combining national and international influences while touring Europe, Latin America and North America. With Heroes del Silencio, Bunbury worked two fundamental aspects which later helped him to define his solo career. The first was the mixture of influences without losing his Spanish-Latino identity and the second: his creative philosophy that recognizes change as an engine. The group was created with a pop debut El Mar No Cesa (1988) and began to rock with the classic Senderos de Traición (1990). Their sound hardened with their two final albums: El Espíritu del Vino (1993) and Avalancha (1996). While the band kept traveling on international tours, releasing hits and accumulated fans with unprecedented success in Spain; Bunbury continued to grow as a singer - defining his character, a restless musician, an exceptional lyricist and unique figure in the Spanish musical scene.  In 1996 the band dissolved and Bunbury started a solo career that has extended to the present. For seventeen years he has continually expanded as an artist, crossing musical boundaries with bravery and courage. For his live performances Enrique put together a band that he baptized “El Huracán Ambulante” with which he toured all over Spain and Latin America, strengthening his connection with the audience on both sides of the ocean.  In 2013, Bunbury reinvents himself with Palosanto (2013), an album with aseptic and cold production applied to hot and emotional songs reflecting on the world’s revolutions as well as the self-inner revolution. It is a new journey of cosmic guitar sounds, earthy rhythms and irreproachable songs, including the first single “Despierta” and other soon to be anthems such as “Más Alto Que Nosotros Sólo el Cielo” and “Todo.”