Only the brave and original survive the indie music maelstrom which either sucks new guitar bands down into the depths or produces identikit sounds capitalising on trends of any given time. Bastille have moved away from the common output being churned out by indie bands to create pop songs that are absorbing and genre defining without ever being formulaic. The origins of Bastille lie in the creative mind of singer/song writer Dan Smith, whose embracement of multi-eclectic musical styles have led to one of the most exciting sounds in new music today. Despite playing the piano and dabbling in instrumentation, Dan did not initially gravitate towards music when he was young. Growing up, he listened to Simon & Garfunkel, The Beach Boys and Fugees, all of which gave him the requisite understanding of harmonies and hooks. However, films were his obsession, with a pertinent affinity to the horror genre, particularly art house fare such as that of Dario Argento and his work in the Giallo sub-genre. This was the gateway to commonly cited influence David Lynch and then onto the more existential work of Terrence Malick. Dan's appreciation of metaphysical cinema is complimented by his literary leanings. Having studied English literature at university, the work of Ian McEwan, Hubert Selby and Brett Easton Ellis were of particularly note with their themes of human thought, sense and sexuality. Compositions like "Oblivion," with its voyeuristic empathy, are the offspring of these themes. Dan is predominantly looking on within the songs. He is the narrator, rarely taking centre stage.